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Mediterranean Horseradish Encrusted Prime Rib Roast

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Mediterranean Horseradish Encrusted Prime Rib Roast
If the friends and the family have been extremely good this year and you want to reward them with the star of meals, then you might consider preparing a standing rib roast (commonly referred to as a prime rib roast). Now, just to clarify, the word “Prime” relates to the grade of the meat, not the cut. It is the highest grade given, and unfortunately it is hard to find. You will, however be able to find the “Choice” grade quite easily in most supermarkets. The “Choice” grade is an absolutely acceptable and tasty substitute, so don’t fret. In fact, I would recommend that you save a few bucks and some searching time and seek a choice rib roast to begin with. The “Choice” has a little less marbling, but this is not a big deal. Don’t however, get a “Select” cut. This type has significantly less marbling (and therefore, flavor) and it isn’t worth the savings.  You will want to keep the bones in the roast, but most butchers will cut the meat away from the bones. If your butcher hasn’t done this, tell them to do it. This will help tremendously when carving and you will thank me. You know, more than you usually do. Also, make sure you pick up a good digital thermometer. Taking the temperature is the only way to be absolutely sure that your roast is done. Trust me, you don’t want to screw this one up.  PREPARATION First of all, you will typically want about 12 oz. per person, but a general rule can be two people per bone. So for 6 people, you will want a three-bone roast. Get a nice deep roasting pan and place the roast bones down in the pan. You can trim a little of the fat, but keep a good layer for flavor. Create your herb paste and spread it all over the roast and then tightly wrap it in saran wrap and leave in in the fridge over night. Make sure that the roast comes to room temperature. This extremely important when cooking meat as it will allow it to cook evenly. If the butcher did not pre-tie the ribs to keep it together, you will want to use butcher’s string to tie the roast as the bones have been cut away. COOKING TIME AND TEMPERATURE You will want to begin cooking at a high temperature to sear in the juices, so preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Place the roast in the oven for 15 minutes and then lower heat to 325- 350 degrees. Baste the roast every half hour or so. Make sure to start checking the temperature about 45 minutes into the cooking process, and then every 20 minutes thereafter. You want the thermometer to read 125 degrees to ensure a medium rare rib roast which is what you want. (Remember, as it sets it will continue to cook and the temp will rise to between 130 and 135 degrees) You will want to let the roast set for about 15 minutes. Do not skip this step. If you cut into the roast too soon, the juices will run out faster than you can say, “Oh sh!t, I screwed up royally.” Carve it so the slices are about one-half to an inch thick. This meal is best served with a nice horseradish sauce.
Mediterranean Horseradish Encrusted Prime Rib Roast
If the friends and the family have been extremely good this year and you want to reward them with the star of meals, then you might consider preparing a standing rib roast (commonly referred to as a prime rib roast). Now, just to clarify, the word “Prime” relates to the grade of the meat, not the cut. It is the highest grade given, and unfortunately it is hard to find. You will, however be able to find the “Choice” grade quite easily in most supermarkets. The “Choice” grade is an absolutely acceptable and tasty substitute, so don’t fret. In fact, I would recommend that you save a few bucks and some searching time and seek a choice rib roast to begin with. The “Choice” has a little less marbling, but this is not a big deal. Don’t however, get a “Select” cut. This type has significantly less marbling (and therefore, flavor) and it isn’t worth the savings.  You will want to keep the bones in the roast, but most butchers will cut the meat away from the bones. If your butcher hasn’t done this, tell them to do it. This will help tremendously when carving and you will thank me. You know, more than you usually do. Also, make sure you pick up a good digital thermometer. Taking the temperature is the only way to be absolutely sure that your roast is done. Trust me, you don’t want to screw this one up.  PREPARATION First of all, you will typically want about 12 oz. per person, but a general rule can be two people per bone. So for 6 people, you will want a three-bone roast. Get a nice deep roasting pan and place the roast bones down in the pan. You can trim a little of the fat, but keep a good layer for flavor. Create your herb paste and spread it all over the roast and then tightly wrap it in saran wrap and leave in in the fridge over night. Make sure that the roast comes to room temperature. This extremely important when cooking meat as it will allow it to cook evenly. If the butcher did not pre-tie the ribs to keep it together, you will want to use butcher’s string to tie the roast as the bones have been cut away. COOKING TIME AND TEMPERATURE You will want to begin cooking at a high temperature to sear in the juices, so preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Place the roast in the oven for 15 minutes and then lower heat to 325- 350 degrees. Baste the roast every half hour or so. Make sure to start checking the temperature about 45 minutes into the cooking process, and then every 20 minutes thereafter. You want the thermometer to read 125 degrees to ensure a medium rare rib roast which is what you want. (Remember, as it sets it will continue to cook and the temp will rise to between 130 and 135 degrees) You will want to let the roast set for about 15 minutes. Do not skip this step. If you cut into the roast too soon, the juices will run out faster than you can say, “Oh sh!t, I screwed up royally.” Carve it so the slices are about one-half to an inch thick. This meal is best served with a nice horseradish sauce.
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Ingredients
  • 1 Standing Rib Roast
  • 4 oz. refrigerated, prepared white horseradish can find in refrigerated aisle
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp Mediterranean herbs or equal mix of dry minced garlic, oregano, dill, and a pinch of coriander
  • 1/2 tsp Fresh Rosemary
Servings:
Ingredients
  • 1 Standing Rib Roast
  • 4 oz. refrigerated, prepared white horseradish can find in refrigerated aisle
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp Mediterranean herbs or equal mix of dry minced garlic, oregano, dill, and a pinch of coriander
  • 1/2 tsp Fresh Rosemary
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients except for the roast and mix thoroughly to form a “paste”. Place roast in a roasting pan and apply paste to roast. Wrap the roast in plastic wrap and seal tightly. Place it in the refrigerator overnight to infuse the flavors into the roast.
  2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  3. Place roast in oven for 20 minutes and then lower the temp to 350 degrees. Take roast out when it reaches 125 degrees in the center.
  4. Remove roast from oven and let sit for 15 minutes so juices re-distribute. Carve and serve!
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